« Back to Previous Page
1
0
RESOLVED
Marked as spam
Posted by SALVE (Questions: 24, Answers: 12)
Asked on February 26, 2016 4:41 pm
160 views
Language and culture affecting inequality? Of course. Just looking within the UK, there are vulnerable and disadvantaged people in every city who cannot access services because they either don’t speak the language, or their culture demands they behave/dress/speak in a certain way. This affects everything from health to employability, and even their ’rights’ to remain in the UK.
(Hazza at June 22, 2016 6:06 pm)
Of course. In some cultures girls will either be educated to a certain level or not educated at all because it is deemed that their place is at home. however, people forget that even a stay at home mother needs to be educated so that they can communicate with schools, help the child with their home work especially reading, take the child to hospital etc. All these associations work more smoothly if the woman is educated. When it comes to language we are all proud of out mother languages however due to globalisation we all need to learn one of the major languages used for communicating with other people. Better still have gadgets that can interpret for those people who have not had the opportunity to immerse in other languages.
(Sam at June 30, 2016 8:54 am)
Add comment
0
Private answer
They could be factors, but the key factor could be people’s attitudes towards things that make them think they are worse than other dominant languages and cultures.
Marked as spam
Posted by Kerry Lee, Taiwan (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on April 1, 2016 9:18 am
Add comment
0
Private answer
Yes, they can cause inequality through issues of “othering”- they need to be transcended so that they don’t becomes issues of inequality.
Marked as spam
Posted by Amy Wisenyerd. UK (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on April 1, 2016 9:16 am
Add comment
0
Private answer
Potential barriers that can increase inequality are language and culture.
Marked as spam
Posted by Karine Favell, UK (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on April 1, 2016 9:14 am
Add comment
0
Private answer
Language definitely plays a role in your identity and the way people respect you! If you can speak the language in the country you are in, even just a little, people will respect you and easily identify with you.
Marked as spam
Posted by Kyle Spinks (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 14, 2016 2:09 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
It’s England and the U.S.A. which have developed technology, films, etc which have been most successful,and that are shared by the world! So everyone will call an iPad and iPad because it was invented, using the English language.
Marked as spam
Posted by Lindsey Pipkin (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:27 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
The fact that, predominantly English, is seen as the universal lingua franca, it’s more superior than others.
Marked as spam
Posted by Lucas Poole (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:24 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
How does this relate to inequality do you think?
Marked as spam
Posted by Kyle Spinks (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:24 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
We are moving into an era of cosmopolitanism in Europe, we live within metres of someone who speaks a different mother tongue, it’s a perfect opportunity to practise and get learning
Marked as spam
Posted by Gina (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:23 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
The world has thousands of languages, so wherever you go, or whatever opportunities you have, you should try and learn a little bit. It will definitely take you to places.
Marked as spam
Posted by D (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:22 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
I think knowing one or two really well is the key to a real immersion in a culture, and therefore breaking down stereotypes through acculturation.
Marked as spam
Posted by Kyle Spinks (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:21 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
So is it necessary to know lots or just one or two perfectly?
Marked as spam
Posted by Hannah Luisa (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:20 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
Learning a language helps break down stereotypes! You learn why people do such things and practise certain things, and can completely immerse yourself in a culture having competence in a language.
Marked as spam
Posted by Lindsey Pipkin (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:20 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
I agree, but with language, comes culture! They have an inseperable relationship! We all learnt language through our cultures, and cultural practises. So learning culture and having culture modules when learning a language is essential too
Marked as spam
Posted by Lucas Poole (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:19 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
In the British education system, to university level, the oral exams are worth practically nothing, so there is little emphasis on being able to speak another language. The majority is to be able to translate, which makes sense with such a huge market in translation. Especially in this era, people are travelling and working, and doing internships, wherever they can!
Marked as spam
Posted by Jin Chen (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:18 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
I agree! It’s very hard for English natives to practise another language because of this exact reason. English natives are almost denied being allowed to practise another language to even improve.
Marked as spam
Posted by Kyle Spinks (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:18 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
I would say they are used more negatively though! Besides as an English native, who can speak French and Spanish, I found it very difficult to communicate in another language when I was abroad, even when I wanted to! As English is the universal lingua franca, everybody jumps at the chance to practise their English
Marked as spam
Posted by Gina (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:17 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
Not all stereotypes are bad!
Marked as spam
Posted by Kyle Spinks (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:16 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
Stereotypes exist for a reason though, and I think without being able to speak a language to a conversational level, there’s no way that people can get to know you, and I think this causes people to judge you more from what little they know of you.
Marked as spam
Posted by Ariel Nash (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:15 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
I disagree a little! I have Japanese friends, and my Japanese isn’t great, but we still have lots of things in common, and they have never stereotyped me for being “typically American”. Not everybody will stereotype others!
Marked as spam
Posted by Rina (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:14 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
I agree. Language is the biggest barrier to communication and without that interaction, people cannot get to know you in the same way, so they go off stereotypes
Marked as spam
Posted by Lindsey Pipkin (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:13 pm
Add comment
0
Private answer
Language definitely plays a role in your identity and the way people respect you! If you can speak the language in the country you are in, even just a little, people will respect you and easily identify with you.
Marked as spam
Posted by Kyle Spinks (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on March 3, 2016 9:12 pm
Add comment
1
Private answer
Language is a larger component to inequality than I think many people realise. Language has the ability to shape our perceptions and limit our expression. This limit to our expression can lead to an inequality in how people are treated. Within a tribe or aboriginal community, it can be easy for locals viewpoints to become disregarded when faced with global businesses, as it can be difficult for people to express their arguments fluently in English for example, or passion and power of phrasing can become lost or nulled in translation. Furthermore, in a wider economic sense, there is an expectation for people to learn the global language of English in order to stand a better chance in careers and education options. This emphasis on stepping up to meet the globalisation of main languages can mean a loss to local tongues. This is a problem many first nation communities are facing in north america, as less and less of the community are bothering to speak their mother tongue or fully appreciate their cultural ancestry, therefore it is becoming lost. This can just be perceived as a necessary sacrifice to keep up in the world, but it is a reflection of the massive inequality, as people’s personal identity, ancestry and cultural connections get more diluted in a world in pursuit of economic globalisation.
Marked as spam
Posted by Heather (Questions: 0, Answers: 2161)
Answered on February 29, 2016 6:17 am
Add comment

Lost Password

Register